Monthly Archives: May 2011

23 April 2014

2014 Graduate Level Adult Day Services Fellowship Announced

Posted April 23, 2014 in Research

The National Adult Day Services Association is accepting applications for the Beth Meyer-Arnold Research Fellowship for original graduate-level research in the area of adult day services. The award supports graduate students who are completing theses and dissertations in areas of interest to adult day services providers and consumers.

Successful applicants will receive mentoring and support from members of the NADSA Research Committee and will be expected to present their research at the annual NADSA conference.  Additionally, fellows and their advisors will be featured on the NADSA website.   An award of $5000 will be provided to recipients ($4000 upon selection and $1000 after NADSA receives a completed final report of their research findings).

Learn more:  http://nadsa.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Meyer-Arnold_Fellowship-2014.pdf.

 

14 April 2014

2014 Adult Day Services Award Nominations Accepted

Posted April 14, 2014 in News / Awards

Do you know somebody who is doing an outstanding job at work or is supporting adult day services locally and impacting adult day services nationally?  Nominate program staff, organizations, caregivers, participants, legislators and advocates who demonstrate excellence and support day services for NADSA’s Annual Awards.

Click here to read the guidelines and complete the application online:

Submit electronic nomination

Download and print the nomination application

Awards recognize program staff, organizations, programs, media representatives, legislators and advocates who support adult day services.  Electronic nominations must be submitted by June 27, 2014.  Winners will be recognized during the National Conference October 10-11, 2014, in Charlotte, NC.   For conference details visit www.nadsa.org.

Why Give Recognition?
  • Recognition for a job well done is a primary motivator for people.
  • Recognition shows employees that they are appreciated and that their contributions count.
  • Recognition increases employee self-esteem which improves morale and leads to a more positive workplace overall, increasing productivity and building commitment to the organization.
  • Recognition improves interaction between supervisors and staff and among staff when they recognize each other’s notable achievements.
  • Recognition nurtures pride and enthusiasm.
  • It’s the right thing to do! Everybody, all of us want and need to be recognized when they’ve worked hard and done an extra special job.

 

Complete the online application (or submit application via email) by June 27, 2014, to give someone the recognition they deserve! 

 Attend the Conference to Support National Recognition

 

Join the National Adult Day Services Association in partnership with the North Carolina Adult Day Services Association in Charlotte, NC, on October 10-11, 2014, at the Westin in downtown Charlotte.  Click here to learn more about the conference.

 

 
  For More Information About NADSA, Visit: http://www.nadsa.org
 
19 March 2014

Adult day services boosts beneficial stress hormones in caregivers

Posted March 19, 2014 in Research in Uncategorized

Family caregivers show an increase in the beneficial stress hormone DHEA-S on days when they use an adult day care service for their relatives with dementia, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of Texas at Austin. DHEA-S controls the harmful effects of cortisol and is associated with better long-term health.

“This is one of the first studies to show that DHEA-S can be modified by an intervention, which, in our case, was the use of an adult day care service,” said Steven Zarit, Distinguished Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, Penn State. “The study is also one of the first to demonstrate that interventions to lower stress on caregivers, such as the use of adult day care services, have an effect on the body’s biological responses to stress. We know that caregivers are at increased risk of illness, because of the long hours of care they provide and the high levels of stress.  These findings suggest that use of adult day care services may protect caregivers against the harmful effects of stress associated with giving care to someone with dementia.”

The researchers studied 151 caregivers of family members with dementia who attend an adult day care service at least two days a week. For eight consecutive days, the caregivers collected their own saliva five times each day and kept a diary of the times at which they collected the saliva. They kept these saliva samples refrigerated until they could be shipped back to the laboratory. During the evenings of each of the eight days, interviewers from the Penn State Survey Research Center called the participants and asked them about the daily stressors they had encountered as well as their mood.

The team’s results suggest that caregivers of family members with dementia who use adult day care services at least two times a week have increased DHEA-S levels on the day following the adult day service visit. The results appear on-line in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry.

“Prior research has found that higher DHEA-S levels are protective against the physiological damaging effects of stressor exposure and may reduce risks of illness,” Zarit said. “We have found that regular use of adult day care services may help reduce depletion of DHEA-S and allow the body to mount a protective and restorative response to the physiological demands of caregiving. These results suggest the value of broadening the focus of caregiver interventions to include their impact on relevant biological risk factors associated with chronic stress and disease.”

The National Institute on Aging supported this research.  Steve Zarit is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Adult Day Services Association.

Other authors on the paper include Courtney Whetzel, research associate in biobehavioral health, Penn State; Kyungmin Kim, postdoctoral fellow, University of Austin at Texas; Elia Femia, research associate in human development and family studies, Penn State; David Almeida, professor of human development and family studies, Penn State; Michael Rovine, professor of human development and family studies, Penn State; and Laura Cousino Klein, associate professor of biobehavioral health, Penn State.

30 January 2014

House of Welcome Receives MindAlert Award

Posted January 30, 2014 in In the News

 The Early Memory Loss Program created by House of Welcome Adult Day Services of the North Shore Senior Center has won the American Society on Aging/MetLife Foundation 2014 Mind Alert Award.  The award recognizes innovative community-based, nonprofit programs based on research to maintain cognitive fitness in older adults. This award will be presented at the American Society on Aging’s national education conference in San Diego at the National Brain Health Forum on Saturday, March 15.

23 January 2014

CDC’s New Website for Long Term Care Can Be Resource for Adult Day Centers

Posted January 23, 2014 in Resources / Providers

The Centers for Disease Control unveiled a new website with infection  prevention resources for long-term care settings such as nursing homes and  assisted living. This site organizes  existing infection prevention guidance and resources into sections for clinical  staff, infection prevention coordinators, and residents. Facilities can also  directly access the new infection tracking system for long-term care facilities  in CDC’s National Healthcare  Safety Network, and the innovative infection prevention tools and resources  developed as part of the partnership between CDC and the Advancing Excellence in America’s Nursing Homes Campaign (AE).

CDC’s long-term care website is available at: http://www.cdc.gov/longtermcare/.

Read more and join the conversation on CDC’s Safe Healthcare  blog: http://blogs.cdc.gov/safehealthcare

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